As I said in the previous post, I decided to go back to my evangelism activities, running after interviews. Despite the short amount of time, around 5 hours, I was able to collect nothing less than 11 interviews.

I had some trouble in the way because my Flip Mino HD battery wasn’t able to hold. Even worst to find out that it takes many hours to fully recharge. When I was almost finished with Nick Quaranto, the Flip went down South. From then on, I used my iPhone camera.

One can’t help it, the Flip is excellent for short clips, or anything fast. But I recorded around 2 and a half hours of footage. If I could, in the future I’d like to have a real camera, with a more decent battery.

Por outro lado, nos dias do evento os palestrantes ficaram bem espalhados e não era muito simples encontrar quem você queria, mas no último dia a maioria estava por perto, o que tornou meu trabalho mais simples. Se a bateria tivesse colaborado acho que conseguiria mais 3 ou 4 entrevistas facilmente.

On the other hand, during the event it was not an easy task to locate a speaker, but in the last day most of them were around the Speaker Lounge, which made my job a bit easier. If the battery were able to hold up, I could have easily recored 3 or 4 interviews.

In this first batch we have Ben Scofield, James Golick, Carl Lerche, Ryan Bates, and Santiago Pastorino.

Ben Scofield

Ben was the Program Chair of the event, co-chairing with Chad Fowler. He was responsible for many aspects of the show, including on organizing the program schedule. They got more than 300 proposals. The challenge was to create a program that was broad enough to not alienate anyone. In general I think they succeeded. Of course, some of us are here for a long time and we wished to have more hard core stuff. Mayne in the future.

James Golick

One the most hyped subjects of the season is non-relational databases, or “NoSQL”. So I wanted opinions from people already using it in some scale. James Golick has been talking about this for a while, specially about Cassandra. The idea was not to discuss specifics on NoSQL, so in the interview I aimed for opinions, why use it, what to use, when to use them and stuff like that.

I know him since around 2008, when I started using his “Resource Controller” gem and even recorded a screencast about it. I asked him to talk a bit about that too.

Carl Lerche

He became more well known after he started working on the big refactor of Rails 3. Carl works with Yehuda at Engine Yard and he also contributed on Merb. More recently he also contributed to the Bundler project, the dependency resolution system coming up with Rails 3. In this interview he tells us more about this project and also talks about investment in open source and Ruby Summer of Code.

Santiago Pastorino

Santiago works for WyeWorks, a 4 people company in Uruguay that deliver projects for Silicon Valley companies. They are teaching us that it doesn’t matter if your country is very small, that your local market is limited, that there are near to none local rubyists around, it is still possible to do great deeds.

And Santiago decided to start working on the Rails project, in the most simple way imaginable at first: by trying to eliminate all the annoying warning messages. It sounds simple, but it is not. And bit by bit he began to learn more about the framework and how to contribute even more. Everybody should follow his foot steps.

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